Practice Areas

Overview of our areas of practice and area of focus.

Bankruptcy

This firm handles Chapter 7, 11, and 13 proceedings throughout the state and the region.

 

Chapter 7

Chapter 7 entitled Liquidation, contemplates an orderly, court-supervised procedure by which a trustee takes over the assets of the debtor's estate, reduces them to cash, and makes distributions to creditors, subject to the debtor's right to retain certain exempt property and the rights of secured creditors. Because there is usually little or no nonexempt property in most chapter 7 cases, there may not be an actual liquidation of the debtor's assets. These cases are called "no-asset cases." A creditor holding an unsecured claim will get a distribution from the bankruptcy estate only if the case is an asset case and the creditor files a proof of claim with the bankruptcy court. In most chapter 7 cases, if the debtor is an individual, he or she receives a discharge that releases him or her from personal liability for certain dischargeable debts. The debtor normally receives a discharge just a few months after the petition is filed. Amendments to the Bankruptcy Code enacted in to the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 require the application of a "means test" to determine whether individual consumer debtors qualify for relief under chapter 7. If such a debtor's income is in excess of certain thresholds, the debtor may not be eligible for chapter 7 relief.   Chapter 7 

 

Chapter 11

Chapter 11 entitled Reorganization, ordinarily is used by commercial enterprises that desire to continue operating a business and repay creditors concurrently through a court-approved plan of reorganization. The chapter 11 debtor usually has the exclusive right to file a plan of reorganization for the first 120 days after it files the case and must provide creditors with a disclosure statement containing information adequate to enable creditors to evaluate the plan. The court ultimately approves (confirms) or disapproves the plan of reorganization. Under the confirmed plan, the debtor can reduce its debts by repaying a portion of its obligations and discharging others. The debtor can also terminate burdensome contracts and leases, recover assets, and rescale its operations in order to return to profitability. Under chapter 11, the debtor normally goes through a period of consolidation and emerges with a reduced debt load and a reorganized business.   Chapter 11

 

Chapter 13

Chapter 13 entitled Adjustment of Debts of an Individual With Regular Income, is designed for an individual debtor who has a regular source of income. Chapter 13 is often preferable to chapter 7 because it enables the debtor to keep a valuable asset, such as a house, and because it allows the debtor to propose a "plan" to repay creditors over time – usually three to five years. Chapter 13 is also used by consumer debtors who do not qualify for chapter 7 relief under the means test. At a confirmation hearing, the court either approves or disapproves the debtor's repayment plan, depending on whether it meets the Bankruptcy Code's requirements for confirmation. Chapter 13 is very different from chapter 7 since the chapter 13 debtor usually remains in possession of the property of the estate and makes payments to creditors, through the trustee, based on the debtor's anticipated income over the life of the plan. Unlike chapter 7, the debtor does not receive an immediate discharge of debts. The debtor must complete the payments required under the plan before the discharge is received. The debtor is protected from lawsuits, garnishments, and other creditor actions while the plan is in effect. The discharge is also somewhat broader (i.e., more debts are eliminated) under chapter 13 than the discharge under chapter 7.   Chapter 13

 

Workers Compensation and Personal Injury

If you are injured at work either through an accident, exposure to harmful substances, or from an occupational disease or repetitive trauma injury, you may have a workers' compensation claim. Workers' compensation insurance may provide benefits for vocational training if you are unable to return to the same job, and can provide disability benefits if your injury has left you disabled and therefore unable to work. Idaho has numerous laws and rules controlling the state's workers' compensation system. An attorney can help an injured worker  navigate the complex rules and regulations. Also, an attorney only gets paid if he is able to recover an award for you.   Injured Worker Info

 

Mediation

Mediation is a process in which a third-party neutral assists in resolving a dispute between two or more parties. It is a non-adversarial approach to conflict resolution. The role of the mediator is to facilitate communication between the parties, assist them in focusing on the real issues of the dispute, and generate options that meet the interests or needs of  relevant parties in an effort to resolve the conflict.

 

Unlike arbitration, where the intermediary listens to the arguments of both sides and makes a decision for the disputants, a mediator assists the parties to develop a solution for themselves. Although mediators sometimes provide ideas, suggestions, or even formal proposals for settlement, the mediator is primarily a "process person," helping the parties define the agenda, identify and reframe the issues, communicate more effectively, find areas of common ground, negotiate fairly and, hopefully, reach an agreement. A successful mediation effort has an outcome that is accepted and owned by the parties themselves.

 

Family Law

We practice in all facets of family law. Are you having legal issues regarding divorce, custody or child support? We can guide you through the process no matter what the issues are.

OtherAreas of Focus

 

We can represent you in these areas:

  •  Construction law 
  •  Taxation
  •  Adoption
  •  Guardianships and Conservatorships
  •  Civil litigation
  •  Real estate law
  •  Commercial litigation
  •  Employment law
  •  Personal injury law
  •  Workers Compensation Law
  •  Employee Issues
  •  Estate planning and probate administration

 

Do you have questions about our services?

Contact us at (208) 263-8517 or via our contact form.